Minutes for March 22, 2022 Regular Meeting

Minutes for March 22, 2022 Regular Meeting
Posted on 04/20/2022
LOS LUNAS SCHOOLS BOARD OF EDUCATION
REGULAR MEETING
MARCH 22, 2022

1. CALL TO ORDER


Ms. C’Moya called the Los Lunas Schools Board of Education meeting to order at 6:04 pm. Ms. C’Moya stated that it was great to see a full house. She welcomed those who were participating in the board meeting in person and those watching the board meeting via livestream on YouTube. She added that the link to the meeting was on the District’s webpage, under the Board of Education page. Ms. C’Moya said the streaming would run through the end of the meeting, and, in the event there was a disruption in the audio portion, she would pause the meeting until it was reestablished.

LLS BOE Members Present: Sonya C’Moya, President
Bruce Bennett, Vice President
Tina Garcia, Secretary
Ragon Espinoza, Member
P. David Vickers, Member

Administrators Present: Dr. Arsenio Romero, Superintendent
Brian Baca, Deputy Superintendent
Claire Cieremans, Chief Finance Officer
Susan Chavez, Chief Student Services Officer
Dr. Deborah Elder, Chief Academic Officer
Cathy Chavez, Dir. of Federal Programs
Karla Dow, Dir. of Assessment Innovations & Accountability
Andy Garcia, Dir. of Maintenance & Construction
Desi Garcia, Dir. of Safety & Security
Jamie Giron, Dir. of Student Nutrition
Mike Good, Dir. of Technology
William Hays, Dir. of Educational Technology
Alicia Himes, Dir. of Professional Learning Innovations
Katherine House, Dir. of Elementary Learning Innovations

1. CALL TO ORDER (Continued)

Administrators Present: Jacqueline Kelly-Romero, COVID Operations Administrator
Mary McGowan, Dir. of Special Services
Jessica Montaño, Dir. of Secondary Learning Innovations
Michelle Romero, Dir. of Purchasing
Andrew Saiz, Dir. of Personnel
Natalie Saiz, Dir. of Support Services
Sandy Traczyk, Dir. of Finance
Elena Trodden, Dir. of Language Learning Innovations
Joseph Barela, Supervisor of Custodians
Carlos Castillo, Payroll Supervisor
Tiffany Gutierrez, Supervisor of Construction
Anthony Silva, Supervisor of Maintenance
Clair Toledo, Principal, Century High / Opportunity Schools
Paul Carder, Principal, Los Lunas High School
Albert Aragon, Principal, Valencia High School
Lawrence Sosa, Principal, Los Lunas Middle School
Joann Carter, Principal, Valencia Middle School
Melissa Contreras, Principal, Ann Parish Elementary
Deanna Herrera, Principal, Bosque Farms Elementary
Diedra Martinez-Munos, Principal, Desert View Elementary
Jeff Hartog, Principal, Katherine Gallegos Elementary
Eric Tiger, Principal, Los Lunas Elementary
Monica Arguello, Principal, Peralta Elementary
Catharine Campbell, Principal, Raymond Gabaldon Elementary
Venessa Tregembo, Principal, Sundance Elementary
Monica Rivera, Principal, Tomé Elementary
Suzanne Chavez, Principal, Valencia Elementary

1. CALL TO ORDER (Continued)

Administrators Present: Jennifer Gaerlan, Asst. Principal, Los Lunas High School
Regina Lucero, Asst. Principal, Los Lunas High School
Robert Sims, Asst. Principal, Los Lunas High School
Jennifer Otero, Asst. Principal, Valencia High School
Chelsey Servantes, Asst. Principal, Valencia High School
Edric Chavez, Asst. Principal, Los Lunas Middle School
Michaela Coffin, Asst. Principal, Valencia Middle School
Adam Hulskamp, Asst. Principal, Bosque Farms Elementary
Sara Graf, Asst. Principal, Desert View Elementary
Teri Gough, Asst. Principal, Katherine Gallegos Elementary
Amy Viramontes, Asst. Principal, Los Lunas Elementary
Regina Sedillos, Asst. Principal, Raymond Gabaldon Elem.
Carolyna Aparici-Chavez, Asst. Principal, Sundance Elem.
Jacqueline Farrell, Asst. Principal, Tomé Elementary
Sheresa Jaramillo, Asst. Principal, Valencia Elementary

Others Present: Mike Baca, Pop Warner
Chris Gillespie, VCARA
John Schaaf, VCARA
Makayla Grijalva, Valencia County News Bulletin
Margo J. Rivera, NEA – Los Lunas
Approximately (25) additional individuals were in attendance.
Approximately (88) individuals watched via streaming.


2. ANNOUNCEMENT OF MEETING

Ms. C’Moya asked Dr. Romero to announce the meeting. Dr. Romero reported the meeting had been announced in accordance with the Open Meetings Resolution, and was a legally constituted meeting of the Los Lunas Schools Board of Education.




3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE: Camilla Gutierrez – Valencia Elementary, and Anastasia Ramirez de Tafoya – Ann Parish Elementary

Ms. C’Moya announced that they had two individuals joining them to lead the Pledge: Camilla Gutierrez from Valencia Elementary, and Anastasia Ramirez de Tafoya from Ann Parish Elementary.

4. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

Ms. C’Moya asked Dr. Romero if there were any changes or deletions to the agenda. Dr. Romero asked to change the order of his Superintendent’s Report; specifically, to move Item 7. C. Other Comments before any reports. He explained they had several individuals from Pop Warner in attendance who wanted to make a presentation, and would like them to be able to do so prior to the other discussions. Ms. C’Moya called for a motion regarding the agenda.

Mr. Espinoza moved, and Mr. Bennett seconded, to approve the agenda as amended. There being no discussion, Ms. C’Moya called for a vote with the following results: Bruce Bennett – yes; P. David Vickers - yes; Tina Garcia – yes; Ragon Espinoza – yes; and Sonya C’Moya – yes. Motion passed. The agenda was approved as amended.



5. APPROVAL OF CONSENT ITEMS


Mr. Bennett moved, and Ms. Garcia seconded, to approve all of the action items on the agenda by consent with the following exceptions: Item #8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 STUDENT CALENDAR and Item #11. E. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS - Approval of MOU Between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools. There being no discussion, Ms. C’Moya called for a vote with the following results: Bruce Bennett – yes; P. David Vickers - yes; Tina Garcia – yes; Ragon Espinoza – yes; and Sonya C’Moya – yes. Motion passed.


6. APPROVAL OF MINUTES: February 15, 2022 Regular Board Meeting
(Approved by Consent)

7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT

C. Other Comments (Order Changed Under Approval of Agenda)
• Dr. Romero welcomed Pop Warner Football Teams, Cheerleaders, coaches and parents to the meeting. He said they were the home of the 2021 Southwest Regional Champions and the Pop Warner Cheer National Qualifiers. Coach Mike Baca, along with other Representatives from the Pop Warner Football Program, presented a plaque to the District for their ongoing support of their program.

A. Student Representative Report: Gabrielle Williamson, Los Lunas High School

Gabrielle thanked the board members and Dr. Romero for the opportunity to speak to them about Los Lunas High School. She then gave the following report.

Gabrielle said that for her, high school had been a sea of experience and opportunity. The greatest thing she’d been able to accomplish in high school had been public speaking. She added that, believe it or not, it wasn’t the first time she’d been asked to read at a board meeting. When she was in the fourth grade, she’d won an essay writing contest and was supposed to read her essay in a board meeting. As soon as she got in front of that crowd, she froze. Gabrielle said she actually started sobbing and someone ended up having to read her paper for her. Without her experiences in high school, Gabrielle said she didn’t know if she ever would have been able to get up there and read her report to them now.

Gabrielle stated that when she was a sophomore in high school, she joined Educators Rising. That year she met so many people and did so many new things. Educators Rising really brought her out of her shell and it helped shape her into the leader she was today. Through Educators Rising, she’d received the opportunity to job shadow, tutor students, and go to the state conference. At their state conference, they competed in various competitions. She said that for example: there were lesson planning competitions, children literature competitions, and an ethical dilemma competition among many others. In between competitions, they were able to participate in breakout rooms to learn new things and meet new people.


7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)
A. Student Representative Report: Gabrielle Williamson, Los Lunas High School (Cont.)

In Educators Rising, they also did projects for the community. Right now, they were working towards creating what were called “free little libraries”. She explained that a free little library was a structure containing 20-30 books that were completely free for people to pick up or leave books in. They had received approval to build them at Daniel Fernandez Park and they were working on getting approval at the Starbucks on Main Street. The goal of the little libraries was to expand the accessibility of books, inspire readers, and to build the community.

Gabrielle stated that the nice thing about Educators Rising was that they also offered it at the collegiate level. After high school, she said she planned on attending New Mexico State University and studying school psychology. Her goal was to be able to work one-on-one with elementary school students to help educate them on mental health and to be a safe space for them to receive help with their own mental health. Gabrielle added that children should never have to hide what they’re going through and that was why she was going to make sure teachers learned how to integrate conversations about mental health into the classroom to help destigmatize it.

Gabrielle said that now that they knew a little about her, she wanted to talk about some important things going on at school that she wanted to highlight.
• On March 1st, the seniors went up the LL Hill and changed the 21 into a 22.
• Student Council recently attended their state competition and took 2nd place in the scrapbook competition.
• Their Health Occupations Students of America Team (HOSA) had their state competition as well where they had 14 students attending and out of those 14, 13 competed with five students placing in the top five in their area of expertise. Those students were currently fundraising to raise money for nationals in Nashville, Tennessee this summer.
7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)

A. Student Representative Report: Gabrielle Williamson, Los Lunas High School (Cont.)
• The Los Lunas High School Drama Club was going to be presenting Treasure Island in late April to elementary students, as well as, having a few public performances.

• Lending a Paw had also done many community service projects this year including starting the LLHS Thrift Store, the Valencia County animal shelter event where Lending a Paw walked, played with, and washed dogs and cats from VCAS, and made projects for preschool teachers who were running for a heart disease fundraiser. Some upcoming projects that Lending a Paw were working on included the Earth Day Project with LLE students and a Women’s History Month project.

Discussion ensued during which the board members talked to Gabrielle about the importance of having a goal in mind, and commended her on her career choice, including Gabrielle’s career path and what had led her toward that choice. Further discussion ensued regarding her phenomenal public speaking skills, the importance of learning that skill, which led to discussion to perhaps pursuing a Toastmasters Program. Suggestions were made to contact the Belen and Los Lunas Libraries as they often had book sales that might help with their library project.

Gabrielle was thanked and commended for her report.

B. School Reports

i. Suzanne Chavez, Principal, Valencia Elementary

Ms. Chavez thanked the board members and Dr. Romero for the opportunity to speak to them about Valencia Elementary. She introduced her Assistant Principal, Sheresa Jaramillo, and recognized her staff who were in attendance. Ms. Chavez and Ms. Jaramillo then gave a PowerPoint Presentation in which they discussed the following areas.


7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)

B. School Reports (Continued)

i. Suzanne Chavez, Principal, Valencia Elementary (Continued)

90-Day Plan Goals
• Improve Tier 1 Instruction in ELA and Math by implementing district accelerated grade level standards to increase student achievement.

• Provide biweekly walk-throughs with debriefs for each teacher to focus on feedback, teacher identifying areas for growth, and developing next steps in an action plan.

• Follow up for action plan occurs in debrief sessions to support and improve Tier 1 instruction.

First Semester Critical Actions
• Collaborative grade lesson plans to support district pacing guide. Emphasis on standards, Tier 1 instruction, small group instruction to address interventions.

• Biweekly classroom walk-throughs with a focus on Domains 2 and 3 areas for improvement and reflection. Debrief to follow walk-throughs to discuss feedback, teachers’ reflection of area of growth, with action steps.

• Beginning of the year iStation reflection to analyze data and make instructional decisions for intervention and extension within the classroom. Teacher will reflect on action steps needed to adjust Tier 1 instruction.

First Semester Outcomes
• Middle of the year iStation data showed students have made gains in some grades and are continuing to work on improvements in other grades.

• Teachers have had continuous biweekly walk-throughs with feedback sessions. Teachers are showing growth with supporting students and reflecting on their instruction to make continuous improvements to support student learning.

7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued) (Continued)

B. School Reports

i. Suzanne Chavez, Principal, Valencia Elementary (Continued)

Next Steps
• Analyzed middle of the year data.
• Focus on identifying and collecting data in regards to rigor in instruction and grade level standards.
• Strengthen learning targets in ELA and Math.
• Focus on small groups for ELA and Math for all students.

Showcase
• Playground
• Positive Behavior Awards

Discussion ensued regarding the various aspects of the presentation including the new playground, with special thanks given to the Maintenance Department, the positive behavior awards that included paw bucks awarded by all staff from the principal to bus drivers, principal phone calls, principal shadowing, the implementation of the CTL task force, and differentiated instruction, staffing including a full time substitute.

The staff at Valencia Elementary who were in attendance were recognized for their dedication, and Ms. Chavez and Ms. Jaramillo were commended for their presentation and the excellent work being done at Valencia Elementary.

ii. Melissa Contreras, Principal, Ann Parish Elementary

Ms. Contreras thanked the board members and Dr. Romero for the opportunity to showcase to them about Ann Parish Elementary. She stated that her Assistant Principal, Maria Merida, was under the weather and was not able to attend in person, but was watching. She then recognized her staff who were in attendance. Ms. Contreras gave a PowerPoint Presentation in which she discussed the following areas.




7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)

B. School Reports (Continued)

ii. Melissa Contreras, Principal, Ann Parish Elementary (Continued)

90-Day Plan Goals
• Improve Tier 1 Instruction in ELA and Math by implementing district accelerated grade level standards to increase student achievement.

• Provide biweekly walk-throughs with debriefs for each teacher to focus on feedback, teacher identifying areas for growth, and developing next steps in an action plan.

• Follow up for action plan occurs in debrief sessions to support and improve Tier 1 instruction

First Semester Critical Actions
• Collaborative grade lesson plans to support district pacing guide. Emphasis on standards, Tier 1 instruction, small group instruction to address interventions.

• Biweekly classroom walk-throughs with a focus on Domains 2 and 3 areas for improvement and reflection. Debrief to follow walk-throughs to discuss feedback, teachers’ reflection of area of growth, with action steps.

• Beginning of the year iStation reflection to analyze data and make instructional decisions for intervention and extension within the classroom. Teacher will reflect on action steps needed to adjust Tier 1 instruction.

First Semester Outcomes
• Middle of the year iStation data showed students have made gains in some grades and were continuing to work on improvements in other grades.

• Teachers had continuous biweekly walk-throughs with feedback sessions. Teachers were showing growth with supporting students and reflecting on their instruction to make continuous improvements to support student learning.

7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)

B. School Report (Continued)

ii. Melissa Contreras, Principal, Ann Parish Elementary (Continued)
Next Steps
• Analyzed middle of the year data.
• Focus on identifying and collecting data in regard to rigor in instruction and grade level standards.

• Strengthen learning targets in ELA and Math.
• Focus on small groups for ELA and Math for all students.

Showcase
• Five-Star Pre-K Program
• Faculty were all Apple Teachers
• Battle of the Books
• Robots Club
• Roadrunner food distribution

Discussion ensued regarding the various areas covered in the presentation including the use of technology at Ann Parish, inclusive of their one-to-one devices at the school, their use of Anderson’s taxonomy, the celebration of their success, as well as, the ongoing commitment of the staff, and the multiple things that she and her staff were doing to help their students and their families. Mr. Vickers asked if there was anything that they were doing that interfered in her work (policy or whatever) to which she clarified that he meant ‘they’ as in the Board? She then said she didn’t believe so.

Mr. Vickers stated the second half of his question to her was what could the Board do to make her work easier? Ms. C’Moya interjected that she (Ms. Contreras) could come back to them on that if need be. Ms. Contreras suggested perhaps that maybe they could come out and visit the school and see what they were doing and talk to their students. She felt that once they came up to Ann Parish Elementary, and once they’d interacted with their students and staff, it really did bring a different perspective.



7. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT (Continued)

B. School Report (Continued)
ii. Melissa Contreras, Principal, Ann Parish Elementary (Continued)

Mr. Vickers stated that it was not too hard for him. His three kids all went to Ann Parish throughout all their elementary years, and they were doing quite well in the professional world now. It was a good experience for him as a parent back then and added that he had been a board member back then, too.

The board members individually commended Ms. Contreras and her staff, and added that they hoped to visit her school soon. They also asked her to extend their best to Ms. Merida.

Dr. Romero stated that Ann Parish was a wonderful example of how they were using technology to increase outcomes for students. They had been able to work through the tools, work through the curriculum, the best practices, so now they were learning how to connect technology to everyday life. It was not simply having a worksheet and having a digital version of that. They were figuring out how to use the technology to improve, not just in the classroom, but as a connection to home and connection to community. He added that to Mr. Vickers' question, and how the Board could support Ann Parish, Ann Parish was a little bit ahead in the time, because their staff was already trained to do that, and as they learned from them, they’d roll it out to the rest of the district. He thought that would be a wonderful way to support the schools.


8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR


Ms. C’Moya stated that the agenda was published on March 9th prior to going on Spring Break. Two individuals submitted requests after that date to address the Board. Board Policy #2.8.8 states that Public Comment was allowed on agenda items when Public Comment was placed on the agenda. However, because of the timing of the agenda being published, followed by Spring Break, and the fact that the 2022-23 student calendar was not consented and would be discussed, she said they would allow the two individuals the opportunity to speak to them about the calendar.


8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

LLMS Student, Evan Meza, thanked the board members and Dr. Romero for allowing him to speak to them about the 2022-23 calendar. He said that as a student, he worked hard in school, and he thought they deserved a break, not extended learning days. He added that he also believed that teachers should also have a break. They needed a break, too, because they did spend a lot of time planning for them (the students) and they wanted them to have a good education. There were some students who may not care about school, but he did and he strived to get good grades. Evan stated that he thought that adding extra days to the calendar wasn't the issue, and he didn’t think it was the right thing to do.

Ms. C’Moya thanked Evan for his comments.


Ms. C’Moya stated that the second individual who asked to address the Board was Justin Talley.

Mr. Talley stated that he admired the young man who came up and presented his opinions. It took a lot of courage, both for him and for the other young lady that evening. He said that they had done an awesome job. Mr. Talley stated that he appreciated the opportunity they gave him that evening to address the Board; however, he feared they were not going to enjoy his comments.

Mr. Tally said that prior to the Board approving a calendar for the next school year, to please consider the following:

There has been a lack of community involvement in preparing the calendar for next year. He had spoken to many teachers and community members. He had not met a single one that was in favor of either calendar option for next year. It was true the two calendar options were made somewhat available to vote on. Mr. Talley said he would say somewhat, as they had to have a Google account in order to have voted on them. Neither of the two options met the needs of the majority of the community. It was true that there were supporters of the extended learning, but they were few and far between. Members of the community felt excluded and underappreciated in the process.

Did the Board and Administration learn nothing from the last time extended learning was almost forced on them? Do they not remember the significant community outcry? It was his belief that the extended learning time schedule was predominantly money driven, and had little to do with what the students in the community actually needed.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

(Mr. Talley’s Comments - Continued)

Mr. Talley stated that research was inconclusive as to the effectiveness of ELT. Research had shown there were better ways to perpetuate success in schools. For example, competitive learning, collaborative learning, and even improving a teacher's verbal ability all had much more significance in a child's success than extending the calendar. It was his belief that there were plenty of days already in the school year that could be better taken advantage of with proper implementation.

Mr. Talley stated that they had seen a drastic decline in the number of teachers in the school systems. There were many classes that had permanent subs. He had students at KGE and LLHS. He added that one of his son's teachers had completely checked out. All assignments, except the final, had been posted to Canvas. His son had completed all the assignments, and had no real reason to continue. His son had another teacher who had mostly checked out. Instead of releasing all the assignments at once, the teacher was releasing the assignments weekly. There was no instruction happening in either case. How did they have success when the teacher was not even present? Selecting either of the two calendar options, he said he feared, would further increase the already crippling teacher deficit. It would further diminish the success of the students in our schools.

Mr. Talley stated that there were many other items that could be brought up in opposition to either of the calendars. Five minutes was not enough time to discuss them all. He stated that he would suggest the Board add a third option to vote on: redo the calendar with real community and teacher involvement.
An affirmative vote for either of the proposed schedules by any board member was, in his opinion, a self-inflicted vote of no confidence in that board member, by the community. He was calling for the teachers union to step up, hear the teacher’s voices, and support the teachers against the calendar options. I am asking the Board to please reconsider the calendar options, and get real community involvement. He asked them to please remember that they worked for the community. He told them to keep in mind that the decisions they were making right now would affect the success of our children tomorrow.

Mr. Tally was thanked for his comments.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

(Mr. Talley’s Comments - Continued)

Dr. Romero thanked everyone for coming. He said he was excited about the possibilities of next year, as they were coming to a close of this year. It was amazing that they were halfway through March and moving into April and May. They had been planning for the next year for quite a while. With that he said he would turn it over to Dr. Elder, and she was going to talk to all of them about the entire process, where they came from, where they were, and the work that had been done this year, as well as, the reasons for moving into the future with some of the recommendations.

Dr. Elder thanked the board members and Dr. Romero, and said she was excited to talk about the development of the calendar options that was before them that evening. She then gave a PowerPoint Presentation during which she discussed the following areas in depth.

Dr. Elder stated that she wanted to start with a bit of background. One of the early things they did in the calendar study team was to look at the New Mexico instructional minimum requirements, and that was without an extended learning program. Dr. Elder explained that in Kindergarten, 990 hours were required. In grades second through twelve, 180 hours were required.

With extended learning, the requirement was 190 days for students. That included 80 hours of professional development, because they knew they couldn’t keep improving learning without improving their own skills as professionals, and finally, they needed before and after-school programs to provide opportunities for extended learning time for all students who wished to participate. She reiterated that that those were the three major components to ELPT in New Mexico.

Dr. Elder stated that she thought it was important to have a little historical view of the number of student learning days in the Los Lunas Schools. In 2016, 17 and several years before that, they had 176 student learning days. She noted that 18 of those were early-release days. She said it was her understanding those took place typically on Wednesdays and that schedule continued through 2018-2019.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)


For 2019-2020, the Los Lunas Schools experienced the first year of Extended Learning Program funding and moved toward 190 days. The Department of Education Department, at that point, agreed to allow Los Lunas Schools to grow into the full 190-day requirement, so it started with eliminating the early release days, thereby increasing student days five days to the 181. In 2021, they had a 181-day calendar. Unfortunately, as they all knew there was a pandemic, and so the actual number of days of instruction that students had, turned out to be only about 95-112 days.

She suggested that they camp on that for a minute. Dr. Elder stated that the beginning of 2020-2021, the first five instructional days, the State gave all districts relief, so they were able to spend five days preparing for remote learning, making sure everyone had a device, making sure everyone had connectivity, there was no expectation of instruction for those five days. The instruction in our district was 125 days delivered remotely. So, the 16 hours per week, teachers elected not to provide instructions on Wednesday, which was allowable, 20 hours if the teachers did. Our students had 29 weeks of remote instruction. In April, students could return to school, but only 48% of them did. And, even for those that did return to school, the school day was reduced by one hour per day. No judgment on any of those decisions. Everybody did what they had to do during COVID, but that was the reality of instructional time in 2020-2021 for our students.

To put that in a little bit more perspective, pre-COVID, chronic absenteeism was defined by 10 days, and in a pre-COVID world, when a student was absent for 10 days, school districts had to implement an intervention plan, up to, and retaining them in the same grade. They were not doing that now. At one point, 10 days was seen as a significant loss of learning.

Moving into this year, 2021-2022, they were on a 186-student learning day, and it was an increase of four student learning days to meet the 190-day requirement for extended learning time program. They had talked a little bit about the impact of COVID-19 on learning time, but she also wanted to give them the best-case scenario for last school year.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Last school year, if a student attended 100% of the time, although many of them didn't, because they couldn't and for other many, many reasons. If the student had five days with 20 hours of weekly instructional time, and, if a student returned to in-person learning in April, which less than half of them did, then the best-case scenario for students who didn't have Wednesday instruction was the 112 days lost. The best way scenario for Wednesday instruction was 95 days lost. That was huge and she felt it was important to acknowledge that.

Dr. Elder stated that when they opened the doors this school year, they were back in person, but by no means normal. They’d had significant COVID cases in our district from August all the way through January and continuing on. In August, for example, they had 22 positive COVID cases for students that resulted in 324 students having to quarantine for 10 days – again, 10 days, 324 students in the first month of school.

She said when they looked through the chart, it was significant, both the amount of time and the amount of students who had missed school this year. Also that had a huge impact on teachers - they have kids who were out on quarantine, and they were back and other kids were out and back. They were trying to keep everybody caught up and were working with them individually and in small groups, and again they had kids in and out. It improved quite a bit in January even though our cases rose significantly due to the requirement for quarantine being reduced from 10 days down to three, as well as, the test-to-stay program. Nevertheless, they still had a significant amount of kids out for a significant number of days, and the impact on that, on the teachers’ exhaustion level couldn’t be understated.

Dr. Elder said they wondered why they’d want to continue an extended learning time program? One, they knew they couldn’t recoup all of that time that had been lost, but what could they do? They could meet the minimum requirements by adding four days to the student calendar to get to the required 190 days. They knew that they hadn’t fully implemented ELTP. They didn’t know what the impact would be if they did fully implement it in a school year where students were healthy. They knew that the gap between their chronological age and social behavior was wider, as well as, their academic skills. Dr. Elder stated that, as she had explained in the last slide, teachers were continually trying to juggle, kids in, kids out, and try to juggle normalcy in the classroom took a great toll on them.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Dr. Elder discussed what was happening in Los Lunas and what was happening nationally. In July of 2021, the Center for Public Education put out a report on how much students had missed academically because of the pandemic. The study was designed to be comparable overtime and assessments covered either a representative sample or a large share of the students enrolled in a school system in the United States, so it was not global. This was just in our country.

Some of the findings showed that students mastered less academic content because of the pandemic and the associated disruptions to schooling. Another important finding was the other measures of instructional time that they saw here all of the time of instructional time, engagement and academic progress strengthens the credibility of the findings and demonstrates further reason for concern. Nationally, teachers were reporting they were able to cover less material this year, as well as last year.

She added that finally, the pandemic's impact on academic achievement was not equitable. In fact, negative impacts were greater for students who qualified as academically disadvantaged than those who were not. In our district that was 67% of our students that qualified as academically disadvantaged. They had a two-pronged approach to mitigate that. It was critical that the time they had was used well, and that they had quality learning time, bell-to-bell, morning to afternoon. Concurrently, they needed to look at establishing the time that they had, the structure of the days and the hours.

For that they had calendar study team. The calendar study team was formed as a function of board policy 1.6.1 that the cabinet would propose calendars with input from employees, so the calendar study team provided input from employees. The calendar study team was selected to provide a representative group of employees based on geography role groups and school levels. She then paused to recognize the members of the calendar study team.

The team was large, and the team met a lot. A lot of work and a lot of time went into this initiative, and she said she really wanted to thank everybody who was a part of that. They had so many great ideas and such a good process and a great deal of community input through that process with representatives.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Additionally, they convened a group of parents who were not Los Lunas employees. They met three times to generate ideas for different calendars. They knew parents who were employees and parents who were not employees brought different perspectives to the table, so we wanted to give parents who were not employees a voice in the process. In fact, one of the calendars that was considered was developed by a parent on that team. More about that in a moment. Additionally, they created a community feedback survey with two calendars that they had the opportunity to participate in and provide feedback that they used in the final product, and all parents had the opportunity to participate in the final vote.

Dr. Elder then discussed the timeline. As she’d said before, they started in November and they started working around the question, how could they best use time to improve student learning? They generated ideas with the calendar study team, the parents who were not employees’ group, as well as, district administrators who all brought a lot of perspective the table. They created six sample calendars, had another round of feedback from the calendar study team and from there, narrowed it down to two and designed the two-sample calendars that went out for community input. One had a longer summer and the other gave more frequent breaks as those were the two major issues that kept coming up over and over again. They knew the last two years had been extremely taxing on our educators, so there was a push to extend the school year time but to also give more frequent breaks for students and for teachers.

They put those two options out. They had over 2,000 responses on those and she took to heart every single one and then it came to the final vote between the two calendars. She interjected and said she wanted to tell them about the feedback on the sample calendars. Again, there were over 2,000 individuals in our district. The major pattern was the preference for a longer summer with fewer breaks during the school year and showed them the graph on the screen. Over 1,500 people asked for the longer summer, to maintain the longer summer.




8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

However, she said it was of note that there were around 400 people who also requested more frequent breaks and identified that as a priority for them. Unfortunately, you can't do both. You can't make both of those happen. Some other patterns of responses, no school for students in June or July, there was a lot of request to have a full week for Thanksgiving break and the request to have spring break, the preference of spring break at the same time as UNM’s spring break to help those in dual credit classes, but also to help families with multiple children at UNM or parents who worked at UNM or went to school at UNM

Dr. Elder stated that the final calendars both had eight weeks of summer. It was clear the community had spoken that they wanted their summer. Both calendar options honored the longer summer. Students wouldn't have school in June or July, and they provided a variety of quite a bit of time for teachers before school started. Teachers' feedback was that three days before students came back was not enough time, so that extended to have five days, one of those being a teacher workday where they had no meetings at all. They placed fall break on Indigenous People’s Day, a two-week winter break, spring break aligned with UNM, April break on Good Friday, six embedded all learner days, 196 workdays for teachers and 190 student learning days to get them into compliance for the first time.

She said she was sure that everybody looked at the website and voted on the two calendars, but just for reference. They were in the Power Point. And so from that, she gave the big reveal from the community vote. They had over 1,100 responses, and almost two-thirds of those voted for option number one.

Dr. Elder stated that, at that point, she would be asking for a vote, but she thought that Dr. Romero had additional comments.

Dr. Romero: Thank you, Dr. Elder and I want to thank everybody on the calendar study committee. They did a tremendous job with the work they had done in November, December, January, February, and March, as they continued to take feedback and make improvements to the calendar. He said he also want to thank everybody in the community for their input. He had heard from numerous community members who wanted something different, and he’d heard from many who were asking for additional support to be with their teachers.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Dr. Romero stated that when they looked at the schools that had presented that evening, they were wonderful examples of how they were improving the instruction, improving the quality time they had with them. The best place they had for those students were with the teachers. They’d had tremendous outcomes when they were learning to use technology and Ann Parish was a great example of that.

They talked about the pandemic, but there were other important reasons why it was an important opportunity for our students. This was something that had been voted on bipartisan across our legislature for a number of years now, and there was a reason for that. They were putting in and investing millions into education. This year alone, it was the highest amount that our legislature had ever invested in education, and he wanted to thank them for that.

There were reasons for that. They knew our students coming to them averaged up to two years behind in kindergarten, so coming in already, the average student coming to them was already behind. They also knew another example they had was a number of students who went on to Higher Ed. And there was a higher percentage of students having to take remedial classes. They also knew they had to respond to a statewide lawsuit. This was definitely an aspect to mitigate some of those opportunities.

Dr. Romero stated that he wanted to talk to them about the calendar that they were going to recommend. Again, he said he wanted to thank everybody on the calendar committee. As they could see, they had numerous, different kinds of groups. They had community members, administrator, union partners in that. So, tonight they did get feedback, and that was the recommended calendar. With the final feedback there was feedback to go with option one, and the differences between option one and option two were just some days as to what it looked like when it came to Thanksgiving, when it came to spring break, and when it came to some specific days.

Dr. Romero went on to explain that one of the things that they had to do, was that they had to have an agreement with our union about it, and they had an agreement with the union for 186 instructional days and 191 days for our staff. In speaking with our union President, he was going on the notion that they had confirmation that they had agreement for the additional days, but he now knew that was no longer the case.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

With that, the calendar that he was going to be recommending to them was 191-day for our teachers, our contract employees and 187 days for instruction. They currently had 186 and were looking at adding one more day. He said he want to make sure he didn’t miss any spots, so asked Dr. Elder to go through the revised calendar with us?

Dr. Elder stated that they wanted to honor the process they had and the hard work of the calendar committee. In order to do, it seemed like the best thing to do was take option one, which was the community's choice and do a little paring back. In order to do that, they made the following recommendations:
• Take two days off of the teacher prep days, so instead of five day, they gave them three, and like last year would get them to 194.
• Take two all learner days that had been scheduled for November 21st and 22nd. That would cover the request to have Thanksgiving off, so that gave them a four-day reduction, with only two impacting student learning
• At the end, if they moved the last day of school for students from the original May 26th to Thursday, May 25th , they would be able to accommodate the five-day reduction that they needed from the community-voted calendar with only impacting students for three days.
• In order to get one more day, they went from six all learner days to five. She noted that they did pop another all-learner day in on Wednesday, November 2nd , so they could keep that momentum for the projects going throughout the first semester.

Dr. Elder stated that would be their recommendation. She added that she knew that our calendar committee worked really hard on options one and option two and our community voted for option one. She felt the modification would enable them to have a calendar tonight and accommodate the need for the 191 days.

Dr. Romero clarified that with the modifications they would be 187 instructional days for students, so which was one more day than they had this year and continue with the same contract days for the employees, which was 191.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Ms. C’Moya thanked Dr. Elder and the calendar committee for their hard work. She added she would like to give each board member an opportunity for discussion before she stood for any motions on that.

Mr. Vickers led discussion regarding the legality of voting on the revisions of the calendar options, and inquired if it needed to be tabled.

Ms. C’Moya stated that the board policy for calendar days stated that the policy was for a minimum certain amount of days, but going out to the community to request their input and feedback, she felt they went above and beyond for questioning their feedback on this. When it came down to the construction of the calendar, they left it to the Superintendent's direction and his staff to make the recommendations. She confirmed that Dr. Romero had made the recommendation.

Mr. Vickers stated that he would like to see the Board revisit their public input policy. When asked, Mr. Vickers confirmed that it was the policy on public comment at meetings, and he thought they needed to readdress it. Ms. C’Moya stated that if you could address the specific policies they would like the Board to visit during a work session, they could schedule that.

Ms. C’Moya went over the board policy regarding public comment. She stated the polices were revised in December of 2017, and they’d used the NMSBA policy team, and our legal team; that was with Mr. Kennedy. Those were the pieces within the policy, including the school calendar, that outlined how it was reviewed on an annual basis, basically, the Cabinet would formulate a proposed calendar with input from employees for presentation to the Board. The superintendent would submit the proposed calendars to the board and advance the meetings and the calendars are to be considered for adoption.

They’d extended that to the community, because the Los Lunas Schools were such a large employer in this community. In addition to that, what they did affected daycare, and what they did affected opportunities for secondary education. She appreciated them looking at UNM.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Mr. Vickers then asked if the state requirement for the extended learning, and that requirement, was it 190 days, but they were obviously not doing that, because of the contract with the union, so where did that put them in regard to compliance with that? And what if they decided not to do that - to not comply He asked what the requirement was for extended learning by the state, what if they choose not to comply and not to participate? He asked if they could give him an idea of what the ramifications would be?

Dr. Romero stated that the legislation did require 190 days. What the PED had done was to allow districts to build up from that. They know it was difficult to go to that from to one year. They were building towards that. They had been able to build it little by little. The attempt was to do that and that was the original proposal, which was 190 days and they would be able to meet the requirements of the grant by staying at 187. They would still get the grant.

Mr. Vickers asked for clarification of the grant and what was driving this and from where, was it coming from Santa Fe or what. It had been mentioned about the high rate of students who go into higher education needing remedial classes, et cetera, and asked if four extra days in a school year would change all of that. Was it a requirement from the State of just if you wanted to be part of the grant, and were we locked into it.

Dr. Romero explained that it was part of a grant. He further explained that if they went back to 2015, 2016, 2017, they were averaging 176 days a year. With that, they had a number of half days. So, if they looked at what they were doing with 186 and the proposal of 187, they were talking about an additional good amount of days each year.

They could think about it over a career of a student. He explained that the career of a student between Kindergarten and 12th grade was 13 years, so add the 10 days by 13 years that was a minimum of 130 days - that was an additional year. When they go back to where students came from, they came two years behind anyway, so that was one effort in closing that gap and being able to do that. Four days by itself do something, no, but when they added 10 days over 13 years that would make an impact.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Mr. Vickers asked them to elaborate on the all-learners day what it entailed for teachers and students. Dr. Elders then explained what the all-learners day would look like for students. They would be developing autonomous learners, so students would have a project that they would plan with the assistance of their teacher, but it would be a district project. Teachers would have support in implementing the project. Students would have a project they execute on their own at their level, appropriate for a kindergarten, appropriate for a 12th grader. They would create a product using their devices that they had to come back and share with their class. They wanted them to build upon each other over the five days over the year and they would like it to build into a portfolio and showcase of learning overtime. That was short answer to many long discussions that our calendar team had.

When asked about grading, Dr. Elders explained they would not be graded. The purpose of the days was to foster innovation, autonomy and agency in learning. If they were going to take an innovative idea, why would they go to school and push it back in the box, right? So, instead of having a grade or punishment or keep them in from recess if they didn't do everything, they said they were going to do, they needed to grow the capabilities for students so, creating opportunities for peer feedback and learning how to give good feedback would be part of the process rather than a grade or punitive type of approach. They didn’t want to squash innovation with that.

Mr. Espinoza stated that when it first came out and they were talking, a lot of people spoke to him about it, faculty or members of the community, and he was fairly ambivalent in the beginning. He was not sure about proposed calendar and he did not want teachers and students to get discouraged. After hearing the numbers and the absences from COVID, those are staggering numbers. That was a lot. Seeing the new proposal was just adding one more day, he felt a lot better about that. He said he thought it was a good avenue for and hope it would help in some ways mitigate the learning loss, but still prevent individuals in the community from becoming too discouraged. He thanked everyone who helped out with this and hopefully, they could find a solution.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Mr. Bennett stated that for him the big question was the all learning day. He was glad they weren’t going to be graded on it. He said he hoped they could track how many students were involved in it, and if they were not involved in this, he thought they would need to get rid of it. He thanked the committee, and said he thought they had done a lot of good work. Mr. Bennett said he would also like to thank all the people who e-mailed him, the good one, the bad one, the students, staff, and he also thanked them for the phone calls.

Ms. Garcia stated that she didn’t really have a question, but just a few things to add.. When they talked about high school kids that might take advantage of the fact there was not a grade tied to it, and there wouldn't be a lot of effort put into it early on, two years on, but when they were starting with kindergarteners who were going to start this process and they were going to grow every year knowing they had this process. They were about innovation and about something different that maybe the school districts had tried in the past, and definitely the state hadn't done in the past. She added that she thought over the year, they would see the numbers improve because there was a buy-in from the student, that the student and the family was seeing there was something positive happening, giving them one day to work on it, but maybe they would work on it on another day, or the weekend or the timeframe that was not that one-day early learning.

Ms. Garcia stated that she thought it was a learning curve that they were all going to have to go through. It was a process that was not going to be solved in year one. She did agree that they had to follow up with what it looked like yearly, five years, 10 years, however long they decided to give it a shot. Listening to the schools that gave them the reports and their innovative ways to teach and do it differently than they had done it in the past motivated her to think that our kids were going to do a great job with this. Change was hard. It was hard for everybody. If she was a fly on the wall, there was probably a lot of discussion on what was the best calendar for our kids, which she hoped was what they started with. Of course, parents had to be included. Of course, teachers had to be included and of course, the unions had to be included. At the end of the day, it was about the kids, at least that was how she saw it.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Ms. Garcia stated that she wanted to give our kids the best possible chance to do better, and if this was where it was a start, not going to be the final and there was going to have to be changes along the way, again, she thought it was a start. She added that the State was requiring them to give it some hard consideration and think about how to make it happen. Mr. Garcia said she appreciated the committee that worked hard to give them options. She appreciated Dr. Romero and Dr. Elder for explaining it to those of them who were not in education. She was not in education, and she needed it spelled out for her and she appreciated it.

Ms. C’Moya thanked Dr. Elder for putting everything together so quickly after the results of the survey and she believed they came in late with the concerns. She wanted everyone in the community to understand that they had heard from voices on both sides. They had been flooded with e-mails. It was great. She encouraged individuals who contacted them to send email her, to call her … to call them. She asked people to be sure to leave phone numbers so they could call them back.

Ms. C’Moya said she was amazed that some people who had children in the district had no idea that their kids were participating in 186 days, they thought it was 180. It was an interesting thing to hear. Getting all of the facts together, having the resources to pull the facts together. She I also wanted to thank those individuals that said, listen to us, please hear us. They were hearing them and that was why they were having the conversations that night. It was unavoidable to put their head in the sand and not recognize that they were number 51 in the country in education. The reporting that they had put together, she knew they had been working on this that showed if they were going to get back that lost learning? The answer was not if they didn’t do anything about it, and they were already behind. They were behind before COVID and they were getting further behind. It had nothing to do with the educators they had in the district. They had phenomenal educators in the district, considering what was best for the students, not just from an educational perspective, but from their emotional wellbeing and the opportunity for them to become autonomous learners, because once they left that classroom, how were they going to function in this world.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Ms. C’Moya stated that what they needed to do, too, was recognized that there were parents out there, phenomenal parents, single parents, dual parents, there are grandparents that are trying to raise these kids and have a balance there, too. They had children that basically went on those half days into a daycare environment. She added that she was not sure how much education they were getting on the half days, so all of these things were for consideration and, she couldn’t thank those committee members enough, because they did above and beyond, put together, listened to everybody, put it out there. It was attacked in the community. Attacked in social media, and she apologized to them for being attacked. They had volunteered. And then, out of those, they got those back, and put it back together, came up with two more.

The e-mails didn't go to the committee, they went to the board members and they appreciated that. What they were doing in this point in time, basically was driven based upon data. They had to keep the kids in mind. They had compromised on the number of days Everybody was skeptical about the all-learners day, and they had been working with UNM-VC and they were excited about students for mentorship and dual programs. She thought where the creativity was going to come in is the elementary school level and from what they were hearing, if they voted and approved it, was that they hear some voices from the parents to the educators, to the child's educator as what they would like to see for the all-learners day. It could be anything from 4H. to coding opportunities. They had a wide level of things that they could do.

Ms. C’Moya stated that she would like to thank our two speakers for coming and speaking. She would asked that they read through the policy, to make sure if you have something to say in public comment, they could let them address. With that said, she said that she knew the administration would appreciate a vote on a calendar that evening, so they could get it and start getting people to schedule spring breaks, Christmases, holidays, getting the airline tickets while they could.

There being no further discussion, Ms. C’Moya called for a motion.

8. APPROVAL OF THE 2022-23 LLS STUDENT CALENDAR (Continued)

Dr. Elder went over the specifics of the changes between the original calendar Option 1 and the revised Option 1.


Ms. Garcia moved to approve the amended calendar Option #1 with 187 student days and 191 days for teachers and educators to follow the agreement with the teachers agreement. Mr. Espinoza seconded the motion. Ms. C’Moya confirmed the wording of the motion, then called for a vote with the following results: Bruce Bennett – yes; P. David Vickers - yes; Tina Garcia – yes; Ragon Espinoza – yes; and Sonya C’Moya – yes. Motion passed.


Ms. C’Moya stated that the motion for the 2022-23 student calendar was approved as amended. She thanked the calendar committee for their dedication and diligence. She thanked Dr. Romero, Dr. Elder, and their staff on hard work on finalizing the needed revisions. Ms. C’Moya added that she felt it was a good compromise.


9. APPROVAL OF UPDATE TO DISTRICT MASTER PLAN PRIORITIES PROJECTS
(Approved by Consent)


10. APPROVAL OF THE 2022 IDEA B POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL
(Approved by Consent)


11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8, 2022)

A. Approval of Reports for February 2022
i. Schedule of Checks Written (Approved by Consent)
ii. Cash on Hand (Approved by Consent)
iii. Investments on Hand (Approved by Consent)
iv. Monthly Budget Reports (Approved by Consent)
v. Revenue (Approved by Consent)


11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8, 2022) (Continued)

B. Approval of Budget Adjustment Requests (BARS)
i. 24113 Ed of Homeless Transfer (Approved by Consent)
ii. 22000 Athletics Cash Increase (Approved by Consent)

iii. 11000 1% ERB Contribution Increase (Approved by Consent)

iv. 11000 Operational Increase
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

v. 11000 Operational Increase
Unit Value (Approved by Consent)

vi. 31701 SB9 Increase
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

vii. 31703 SB9 State Match Increase
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

viii. 31100 Bond Building Increase
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

ix. 31600 Capital Improvements Decrease
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

x. 21000 Food Service Increase
Budgeted Cash to Audited Cash (Approved by Consent)

xi. 27153 Extended Learning Transportation
Initial Budget (Approved by Consent)

xii. 24183 USDA School Equipment Initial Budget
(Approved by Consent)


11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8, 2022) (Continued)

C. Approval of Purchases

i. CES c/o Robert Cohen, for VMS Gym Flooring, Maintenance & Construction Dept. 31167 – Bond (Approved by Consent)

ii. CES c/o Robert Cohen, for VHS Synthetic Football Turf & Running Track Resurfacing Maintenance & Operations Dept. 31164 & 31703 - Bond & Two Mill (Approved by Consent)

iii. Apple Computers Inc., for District MacBook Air/iPads Technology Dept. 31600 – Three Mill (Approved by Consent)


iv. Eduporium, for Robotic Supplies, Special Services Dept. Innovation & Design Labs 24330 - ESSER III (Approved by Consent)


v. School Outfitters LLC, for Special Services Dept. Innovation & Design Labs 24330 – ESSER III (Approved by Consent)


vi. Approval of Award Recommendation: RFP 2022-004-HR for Asphalt Improvements & Repair Cooperative Price Agreement with Valencia County
(Approved by Consent)


D. Approval of Deletion of Fixed Assets (Approved by Consent)


















11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8 2022)
(Continued)


E. Approval of MOU Between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools

Without further ado, Ms. C’Moya stated they had one more action item. Item #11E., Approval of MOU between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools. She then turned it over to Dr. Romero.

Dr. Romero explained that the item was for approval of a MOU Between the Valencia County amateur radio association even Los Lunas Schools. This is a wonderful partnership. We have John here tonight and I think you have a guest with you also. Mr. Shaw has talked about the work he has done with amateur radio. I love to hear from him, and it is something I want him to teach me personally. I'm excited about this MOU that we have proposed between us. John, I'm going to turn it over to you if you want to come to the podium.

John Schaaf thanked the board members and Dr. Romero for the opportunity to speak to them about the proposed MOU between the Valencia school district and the amateur radio association. He explained that both he and his Chris Gillespie who was with him, were licensed hand radio operators. The license from the F.C.C. was something that they studied for, and added that they had to take a test to acquire this license. The license allowed them to purchase or build our own amateur radio equipment, which included radios and antennas, linking equipment for computers and other kind of computer equipment.

The MOU was a proposal to use the antenna tourer that was across the street of the Luna building to install amateur radio linking equipment to link some of our amateur radio repeaters around Valencia County together for emergency communications. The other benefit that they would receive as a club was a very small amount of Internet bandwidth from the school district - mostly to be used on nights and weekends.

11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8 2022) (Continued)



E. Approval of MOU Between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools

John explained amateur radio was a hobby for us. They did it for fun, and they talked to people all over the world through antennas. They used the Internet sometimes, but the biggest thrill and the biggest challenge was to do it with the equipment that they made, built, purchase and put up themselves and do it over the air waves. They also provided communication in times of disaster.

John stated that he’d brought his friend Chris Gillespie to talk about amateur emergency services and what they would be doing with the linking equipment. Mr. Gillespie, the coordinator for amateur relay league, which is a nationwide group for Valencia County, was also president of the Valencia County amateur radio association.

Mr. Gillespie stated that they also worked work fairly closely with the Valencia County emergency manager, They had three repeaters around Valencia County, none of which were currently interconnected, although he had one of them that he could link to with another amateur radio that would allow someone to come off of the Internet and speak through it digitally.

There was a tremendous amount of opportunity for students in STEM that had to do with amateur radio. He said he could give them a few names including one who had started out as a boy scout. His grandfather got him started in amateur radio. He is now one of the lead engineers for Kirkland Air Force because of the amateur radio license and getting the want to learn how to build equipment that John was alluding to. To him that was another thing this club can offer.


11. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS (Meeting Held March 8 2022)
(Continued)


E. Approval of MOU Between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools (Continued)

Mr. Gillespie stated that they had a couple of clubs within schools in the Albuquerque area. Their club could offer mentoring within their club, and could help set up amateur radio clubs within whatever school it felts like might be the best fit at whatever level the board decided and the teachers that would take that and work with it.

Discussion ensued regarding the details of the MOU including the organization working with the schools and students, especially, their status of an amateur group, which was sometimes a deterrent, but which simply meant they were not paid for what they did. Everything they did was volunteer. They brought their own equipment, and they would set up for days on end sometimes to manage an emergency of some kind that needed axillary communicates. Included in their work with students was their wiliness to use their own license to enable students to actually get on the air and let them talk on the radio for a few minutes.

Further discussion ensued regarding the amount of bandwidth that would be utilized, as well as, the current band width. It was explained that it would be used on nights and weekends. Dir. of Technology, Mike Good, explained that the internet access was up to 512-kolobutes per second, and what they were asked for was very small and would not affect the district at all.

Ms. C C'Moya thanked them for their presentation and then called for a motion.

Mr. Espinoza moved, and Mr. Bennett seconded, to approve Item #11. E. FINANCE COMMITTEE ITEMS - Approval of MOU Between Valencia County Amateur Radio Association and Los Lunas Schools. There being no discussion, she then called for a vote with the following results: Bruce Bennett – yes; P. David Vickers - yes; Tina Garcia – yes; Ragon Espinoza – yes; and Sonya C’Moya – yes. Motion passed.



12. ANNOUNCEMENT OF MEETINGS

Ms. C’Moya stated that brought them to Item #12. ANNOUNCEMENT OF MEETINGS.

As allowed by the NM Open Meetings Act and the District’s Open Meetings Resolution, on occasion, a quorum of the board members would attend the same function, including those held at school sites, at the district level, as well as, sports functions, conferences, workshops, and trainings. Board members would refrain from discussing and/or acting on LLS Board issues in those settings. In addition, only official meetings were published, and if other meetings were scheduled, they would be announced in accordance with the Open Meetings Act.
Ms. C’Moya stated that she would like to announce the following meetings.

• March 29, 2022 LLS BoE Work Session
CO Board Room 5:00 pm
Topic: 2022-23 Budget (Quorum in Attendance)

• April 1- 4, 2022 2022 NSBA Annual Conference & Exposition
San Diego Conference Center San Diego, CA
(Quorum in Attendance)
• April 12, 2022 Finance Meeting
CO Board Room 9:00 am

• April 12, 2022 NEA Budget Workshop
CO Board Room 3:00 pm Topic: 2022-23 Budget Presentation (Quorum may be in Attendance)

• April 12, 2022 Parent Advisory/Public Hearing
CO Board Room 6:00 pm Topic: 2022-23 Budget Presentation (Quorum may be in Attendance)

• April 13, 2022 NMSBA Region IV Spring Meeting
148 Spartan Alley, Bernalillo, NM 5:30 pm
(Quorum in Attendance)

• April 19, 2022 LLS BoE Final Budget Work Session
CO Board Room 4:30 pm
Topic: 2022-23 Budget Presentation (Quorum in Attendance)

• April 19, 2022 Regular Board Meeting
CO Board Room 6:00 pm

13. ADJOURNMENT

Ms. C’Moya stated that brought them to Item #13. ADJOURNMENT. She then called for a motion to adjourn the meeting.

Mr. Bennett moved, and Ms. Garcia seconded, to adjourn the meeting. There being no discussion, Ms. C’Moya called for a vote with the following results: Bruce Bennett – yes; P. David Vickers - yes; Tina Garcia – yes; Ragon Espinoza – yes; and Sonya C’Moya – yes.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:06 pm.

Approved this 19th day of April 2022.

Sonya C’Moya, Board President
Tina Garcia, Board Secretary

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